Posts about Release

New release: Brian 2.3

Happy New Year to all Brian users 🎉! We are happy to announce a new release, Brian 2.3. This release fixes a number of bugs and introduces some new features. It also paves the way for the transition from Python 2 to Python 3 – given that Python 2 is now no longer officially supported, Brian 2.3 will be the last release to support Python 2. For a full list of changes, see the release notes. We recommend all users of Brian 2 to update.

Brian 2 can be installed with Anaconda from the conda-forge channel (packages are provided for Python 2.7, 3.6, 3.7, 3.8), or with pip from the pypi repository.

As always, please report bugs or suggestions to the github bug tracker or to the brian-development mailing list (brian-development@googlegroups.com).

Brian 2.2

We are happy to announce the release of Brian 2.2. This release includes a number of important fixes and performance improvements. It also makes sure that simulation no longer give platform-dependent results for certain corner cases that involve the division of integers. For a full list of changes, see the release notes. We recommend all users of Brian 2 to update.

Brian 2 can be installed with Anaconda from the conda-forge channel, or with pip from the pypi repository.

Detailed installation instructions: http://brian2.readthedocs.io/en/2.2/introduction/install.html

As always, please report bugs or suggestions to the github bug tracker (https://github.com/brian-team/brian2/issues) or to the brian-development mailing list (brian-development@googlegroups.com).

Brian 2.1.3

We are happy to announce the release of Brian 2.1.3. This release includes a number of important fixes and performance improvements. For a full list of changes, see the release notes. We recommend all users of Brian 2 to update.

From this release on, conda packages will be provided via the conda-forge channel. For a limited time, we will additionally copy over packages to the brian-team channel, but this channel should now be considered deprecated.

How to get Brian 2: http://brian2.readthedocs.io/en/2.1.3.1/introduction/install.html

As always, please report bugs or suggestions to the github bug tracker (https://github.com/brian-team/brian2/issues) or to the brian-development mailing list (brian-development@googlegroups.com).

Brian 2.1.2 and Brian2GeNN 1.1.5

We have released new bug fix releases for Brian 2 (version 2.1.2) and Brian2GeNN (version 1.1.5).

The new Brian 2 release fixes two bugs:

  1. an incorrect application of the substitution mechanism in equations (i.e. when using the same set of equations several times and changing the equations' variable names via Brian's Equation class), and
  2. an inadvertent deactivation of parts of the new caching mechanism which resulted in a major reduction of its performance improvement.
The Brian2GeNN release adds a workaround for a bug in some version of the glibc library on Linux which can potentially lead to drastically reduced performance. This is the same workaround that had already been applied to Brian 2's C++ standalone mode with an earlier release.

How to get Brian 2: http://brian2.readthedocs.io/en/2.1.2/introduction/install.html

How to get Brian2GeNN: http://brian2genn.readthedocs.io/en/latest/introduction/index.html

As always, please report bugs or suggestions to the github bug tracker (https://github.com/brian-team/brian2/issues) or to the brian-development mailing list (brian-development@googlegroups.com).

Brian 2.1 and Brian2GeNN 1.1

We are happy to announce the release of Brian 2.1. This release includes a number of fixes and small improvements, and two new major features: support for numerical integration with adaptive-timestep methods based on the GNU Scientific Library, and caching of code generation leading to faster simulation setup times, in particular for multiple runs of the same model. For an extensive list of changes, see the release notes. We recommend all users of Brian 2 to update.

We also release a new version 1.1. of Brian2GeNN, Brian's interface to the GPU-enhanced Neuronal Network simulation environment (GeNN). This release does not contain any major new features except for bug and compatibility fixes, but an update is required for all users that update to Brian 2.1.

How to get Brian 2: follow the installation instructions in the documentation

Further information about Brian2: http://brian2.readthedocs.org

As always, please report bugs or suggestions to the github bug tracker or to the brian-development mailing list (brian-development@googlegroups.com).

Brian2GeNN 1.0

We are proud to announce the release of Brian2GeNN, the Brian 2 interface to the GPU-enhanced Neuronal Network (GeNN) simulator. With this interface, a Brian 2 script (as long as it only uses supported features) can benefit from the potential performance benefits of a GPU by adding just two lines to the start of the script: import brian2genn set_device('genn')

Brian2GeNN can be installed from the same Anaconda repository channel as Brian itself:

conda install -c brian-team brian2genn

This installation method will also include the GeNN simulator, while an installation from PyPI (via pip install brian2genn) will require a manual installation of GeNN. See the documentation (http://brian2genn.readthedocs.io) for more details.

Note that in all cases, users need a CUDA-capable NVIDIA GPU and a manual installation of the CUDA SDK.

The actual performance benefits of using a GPU to run the simulation depend strongly on the details of the model but can be significant. With the Brian2GeNN package, we hope to make it as easy as possible for users to try it out for themselves.

In case you run into problems with the installation of the package or with its use, please contact us at brian-development@googlegroups.com or open an issue on the Brian2GeNN bug tracker.

Brian 2.0.2

We are happy to announce the release of Brian 2.0.2. This release includes a large number of fixes and improvements, in particular important updates for the unit system and multi-compartmental simulations. Note that with this release we provide conda packages for Python 3.6, but no longer for Python 3.4. For an extensive list of changes, see the release notes. We recommend all users of Brian 2 to update.

How to get Brian 2: follow the installation instructions in the documentation

Further information about Brian2: http://brian2.readthedocs.org

As always, please report bugs or suggestions to the github bug tracker or to the brian-development mailing list (brian-development@googlegroups.com).

Brian 2.0.1

We are happy to announce the release of Brian 2.0.1. This is a bug fix release which does not add any new features but fixes a few important bugs and updates the documentation. Earlier versions of Brian 2 contained bugs that could lead to incorrect recordings from subgroups with PopulationRateMonitor and SpikeMonitor. The issue was only triggered under quite specific circumstances and not for all code generation targets (for more details, see github issues 772 and 777), but could in the worst case lead to the recording of incorrectly high firing rates at certain time steps (for SpikeMonitor, the bug meant that spikes beyond the size of the subgroup were recorded).

The new release also fixes a few other issues reported by users, see the release notes for more information. We strongly recommend all users of Brian 2 to update.

How to get Brian 2: follow the installation instructions in the documentation

Further information about Brian2: http://brian2.readthedocs.org

As always, please report bugs or suggestions to the github bug tracker or to the brian-development mailing list (brian-development@googlegroups.com).

Brian 2.0

We are very pleased to announce the release of version 2.0 of the Brian neural network simulator.

Brian is a free, open source simulator for spiking neural networks. It is written in the Python programming language and is available on almost all platforms. We believe that a simulator should not only save the time of processors, but also the time of scientists. Brian is therefore designed to be easy to learn and use, highly flexible and easily extensible.

You can learn more about Brian from our front page. You can also try out Brian from your web browser, without having to install any software, using our interactive demo.

Major new features in 2.0
  • Much more flexible model definitions. The behaviour of all model elements can now be defined by arbitrary equations specified in standard mathematical notation.
  • Code generation as standard. Behind the scenes, Brian automatically generates and compiles C++ code to simulate your model, making it much faster.
  • "Standalone mode". In this mode, Brian generates a complete C++ project tree that implements your model. This can be then be compiled and run entirely independently of Brian. This leads to both highly efficient code, as well as making it much easier to run simulations on non-standard computational hardware, for example on robotics platforms.
  • Multicompartmental modelling.
  • Python 2 and 3 support.
That's just a small fraction of the new features in 2.0, take a look at the full list.
Upgrading from Brian 1.4
Brian 2 is a rewrite from scratch, and introduces some backwards incompatible changes. In most cases, these should be relatively simple. We've written a detailed guide on how to update your simulations. Note that you can have both Brian 1 and Brian 2 installed simultaneously, so you can switch gradually.
Thanks
Brian 2 was written by Marcel Stimberg, Dan Goodman and Romain Brette.

Do please remember to cite Brian if you use it for your research.

We would also like to thank the large number of users (over 40) who contributed code, bug reports, etc.