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Perceiving and knowing

Perceiving space is knowing where things are in the world. Or is it?

I am sitting in my living room, and there are big windows on a courtyard. The windows are sound-proof and so if I open just one, acoustical waves mostly enter the room through that window. Now someone enters the courtyard on the [...]

Spatial perception of pain (III) How can we feel pain inside the body?

I will first start with a summary of the different propositions I made in the previous post about where it hurts.

- Proposition A (independent channels): there are two independent channels, one that provides pain information (intensity or quality of pain, through pain receptors) and another one that provides spatial information (through tactile receptors or [...]

Spatial perception of pain (II)

Where does it hurt? A common answer to this question is: it hurts at the location of the pain receptors in the body. I will discuss three counter-arguments to this proposition, starting with the simple one. The simple argument is that there is a discrete set of pain receptors on the skin, but the spatial [...]

Spatial perception of pain (I)

Pain is a great example of many important themes in philosophy of perception. Here I want to focus on spatial perception, but I will start with a few general comments.

First of all, why do we feel pain in the first place? Scientists tend to offer two types of explanations. One is expressed in terms [...]

What is computational neuroscience? (XXII) The whole is greater than the sum of its parts

In this post, I want to come back on methodological reductionism, the idea that the right way, or the only way, to understand the whole is to understand the elements that compose it. A classical rebuttal of methodological reductionism is that the “whole is greater than the sum of its parts” (Aristotle). I feel that [...]

What is computational neuroscience? (XXI) Lewis Carroll and Norbert Wiener on detailed models

The last published novel of Lewis Carroll, Sylvie and Bruno (1893 for the second volume), contains a passage that explains that a high level of detail is not necessarily what you want from a model. I quote it in full:

“What a useful thing a pocket-map is!” I remarked.

“That’s another thing we’ve learned from [...]

Subjective physics

I just finished writing a text about « subjective physics »: a term I made up to designate the description of the laws that govern sensory signals and their relationships with actions. It is relevant to systems computational neuroscience, embodiment theories and psychological theories of perception (in particular Gibson’s ecological theory and the sensorimotor theory). Here is [...]

What is computational neuroscience? (XX) What is a realistic model?

What is a realistic neuron model? There is a hierarchy among neuron models, which goes like this: least realistic model is the integrate-and-fire model, which is phenomenological; then the single-compartment Hodgkin-Huxley model; then multicompartmental Hodgkin-Huxley models (this hierarchy is questioned by a recently accepted paper that I wrote, but I will discuss it when the [...]

What is sound? (XVI) On the spatial character of tones

An intriguing fact about the pitch of tones is that we tend to describe it using spatial characteristics such as “high” and “low”. In the same way, we speak of a rising intonation when the pitch increases. A sequence of notes with increasing frequency played on a piano scale is described as going “up” (even [...]

What is computational neuroscience? (XIX) Does the brain process information?

A general phrase that one reads very often about the brain in the context of perception is that it “processes information”. I have already discussed the term “information”, which is ambiguous and misleading. But here I want to discuss the term “process”. Is it true that the brain is in the business of “information processing”?

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